Archive for the ‘Keysight’ Category

Tech Focus: Spot Your Security Vulnerability Before Hackers Do

Friday, March 18th, 2022

Every network has a security vulnerability – where is yours? In this guest commentary, Keith Bromley from Keysight Technologies shares a three-point plan on how to find your security vulnerability before hackers beat you to it.

Keith Bromley from Keysight Technologies shares his 3-step plan to help you discover your network security vulnerability before hackers do it for you.

Keith Bromley from Keysight Technologies shares his 3-step plan to help you discover your network security vulnerability before hackers do it for you.

One of the top questions on the minds of network security personnel is “how do I reduce my security risk?”

Even for smaller organisations this is important because every network has a weakness. But, do you know where you are the most vulnerable? Wouldn’t you like to fix the problem now, before a hacker exploits it?

Here is a three-point plan that works to expose intrusions and decrease network security risk.

Network security – It all starts with prevention

Inline security solutions are a high impact technique that businesses can deploy to address security threats. These solutions can eliminate 90% or more of incoming security threats before they even enter your network.

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Tech Focus: Raising the Bar on Autonomous Vehicle Safety

Thursday, February 10th, 2022

The fully autonomous vehicles of the not-so-distant future promise tremendous gains in automotive safety and transportation efficiency.

In this guest commentary, Thomas Goetzl from Keysight Technologies shares his insights on how automotive OEMs must move beyond contemporary levels of vehicle autonomy to fulfill this promise.

Keysight's Radar Scene Emulator (RSE) closes the gap between software simulation and roadway testing, and training ADAS and autonomous driving algorithms to real-world conditions.

Keysight’s Radar Scene Emulator (RSE) closes the gap between software simulation and roadway testing, and training ADAS and autonomous driving algorithms to real-world conditions.

SAE International (formerly the Society of Automotive Engineers) defines six levels of vehicle autonomy, with Level 0 representing fully manual and Level 5 representing fully autonomous.

Today’s most advanced autonomous vehicle systems rate only Level 3, which means they are capable of making some decisions such as acceleration or braking without human intervention.

“In order to make the leap to the tremendous gains in automotive safety and transportation efficiency that fully autonomous vehicles promise, OEMs will need to overcome a unique set of challenges for testing automotive radar sensors in advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving systems, as well as developing new methodologies for training algorithms that conventional solutions are ill-equipped to address,” says Thomas Goetzl, vice president of automotive and energy solutions at Keysight Technologies.

Getting from Level 3 to Level 5 will require many breakthroughs, including closing the gap between software simulation and roadway testing, and training ADAS and autonomous driving algorithms to real-world conditions.

Keysight’s latest innovation, the Radar Scene Emulator (RSE), goes a long way toward bridging these gaps.

Software simulation plays an important role in autonomous vehicle development.

Simulating environments through software can help validate the capabilities of ADAS and autonomous driving systems.

But simulation cannot fully replicate real-world driving conditions or the potential for imperfect sensor response — something that fully autonomous vehicles will inevitably have to contend with.

OEMs rely on road testing to validate ADAS and autonomous driving systems prior to bringing them to market.

While road testing is and will continue to be a vital and necessary component of the development process, it is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to repeat specifically in the area of controlling environmental conditions.

Relying on road testing alone to develop vehicles reliable enough to navigate urban and rural roadways safely 100% of the time would take decades.

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Tech Focus: Monitoring Battery Temperature by Using a Data Acquisition System or Specialised Battery Test System

Wednesday, January 19th, 2022

In today’s electronics applications, batteries power nearly all of our portable electronic devices. Batteries also serve as emergency power backup systems on large premises. And all-electric vehicles use large cascading battery packs to meet the expected power for the required performance.

In this guest commentary, Bernard Ang from Keysight Technologies shares his insights on specialised battery testing.

Batteries are the key to our portable/mobile electronic gadgets in this digital era.

Batteries are the key to our portable/mobile electronic gadgets in this digital era.

Battery packs need the required specific power (W/kg) to be able to dispense enough current to achieve the electric vehicle speed performance.

They also need the required specific energy (Wh/kg) to achieve longer runtime or travel range.

Why is it important to monitor battery temperature?

Most rechargeable batteries today are lithium ion and have an operating range between 15 °C and 35 °C at which their full performance and capacity kicks in.

  • If the battery and its ambient temperature is below 15 °C, you may experience sluggish electrochemical reactions within the battery and as a result, lower battery performance and reduced charge capacity.
  • If the battery or battery pack operates above 35 °C in ambient temperature, battery degradation can accelerate over time. As a result, you may notice shorter battery life, non-uniform aging due to thermal gradients, greater exposure to safety issues, and higher life cycle costs. At extremely hot temperatures, batteries can break down and cause leakage, smoke, fire, and even explosions.

The power map chart below shows the power limits of your lithium-ion battery or battery packs across the temperature range.

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Tech Focus: Looking Ahead – High Speed In-Vehicle Display and Sensor Connections (Part 2 of 2)

Friday, December 17th, 2021

In this two-part guest commentary, Carrie Browen and Kevin Kershner from Keysight Technologies share their insights into the future of high speed in-vehicle display and sensor connections. You may find Part 1 here.

Automotive display use-case. © 2021 MIPI Alliance, Inc.

Automotive display use-case. © 2021 MIPI Alliance, Inc.

For this second half of our commentary, we begin with an introduction of SerDes.

In today’s infotainment systems, it is common for in-vehicle cameras and displays to be connected to the image-processing electronic control unit (ECU) via a SerDes (serializer/deserializer) connection.

Today, they are delivered by individual vendors using closed, proprietary standards.

Extending the reach of feature-rich SerDes links can require operating at lower Baud rates and higher order modulations (e.g. PAM-4).

In addition, it will require higher bandwidth Ethernet links as primary interconnects between zones, perhaps with 802.3ch support up to 10 Gbps throughput.

Emerging SerDes standards like mobile industry processor interface (MIPI) A-PHY (MIPI A-PHY is a physical layer specification targeted for ADAS/ADS surround sensor applications and Infotainment display applications in automotive) and Automotive SerDes Alliance (ASA) will be implemented by multiple silicon vendors.

This will create a competitive market that acts to drive down the cost while delivering application specific features.

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