Archive for the ‘Singapore’ Category

YOLO Run 2015: 5km Shirtless Run gives T-shirts to underprivileged children

Saturday, October 24th, 2015

If you’re in Singapore on Sunday, 22 November 2015 run shirtless (not topless) for a good cause from 8am to 12pm at Gardens by the Bay. Registration: S$69.90.

YOLO thrill seekers can now sign up at www.yolorun.com at S$69.90. Registration closes next Saturday on 7 November 2015. Image credit: www.yolorun.com.

YOLO thrill seekers can now sign up at www.yolorun.com at S$69.90. Registration closes next Saturday on 7 November 2015. Image credit: www.yolorun.com.

With every shirtless runner, X-Change Republic Pte Ltd will donate a T-shirt to the underprivileged children in developing countries in partnership with the T Foundation, a non-profit organisation committed to the development and spread of entrepreneurship around the globe.

“The inaugural YOLO Run aims to push the boat out with the bravery of individuals to live freely and purposefully. To go beyond more than just sweating it out for a five-kilometre, we want to challenge participants to race shirtless and liberate themselves from their inner insecurities,” said YOLO Run 2015 race director, Brandon Lee.

Ladies are encouraged to race in their exclusive YOLO Run sports bra which comes with the race pack.

As for the gentlemen, you can wear the YOLO Run singlet.

A finisher T-shirt along with a yoga mat will be part of the race entitlements to accompany the participants in the mass yoga session at the end of the run.

The organisers aim to break into the Singapore Book of Records for the most number of shirtless runners at an event.

YOLO Runners can also participate in exciting fringe activities in surprise YOLO Zones.

POTD: Corridor in Masjid Abdul Gafoor in Singapore

Monday, August 10th, 2015

Amidst the searing heat of the afternoon sun, the mosque offers a cool refuge and respite for worshippers and visitors.

The corridor is still empty, although in an hours’ time, worshippers will arrive for the Friday prayers. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The corridor is still empty, although in an hours’ time, worshippers will arrive for the Friday prayers. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Masjid Abdul Gafoor was gazetted as a national monument of Singapore on 13 July 1979.

Gowns for worshippers’ perusal in the Abdul Gaffoor Mosque. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Gowns for worshippers’ perusal in the Abdul Gaffoor Mosque. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

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POTD: Rooftop tower at Masjid Abdul Gafoor in Singapore

Saturday, August 1st, 2015

Photo of the Day: The rooftop tower is directly above the cupola above the prayer hall of the mosque.

* Information from Wikipedia article on Masjid Abdul Gaffoor.

The tower has eight sides and has three levels demarcated with Doric pilasters. Photo taken using a Canon EOS M3 and 18-55mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The tower has eight sides and has three levels demarcated with Doric pilasters. Photo taken using a Canon EOS M3 and 18-55mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

On the lowest of three levels of the tower are eight cinquefoil windows with coloured glass panes which let light through to the interior.

The middle level has pilasters and capitals below a balustrade with bottleneck balusters.

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POTD: Stairs to heaven at Masjid Abdul Gafoor in Singapore

Sunday, July 26th, 2015

The Abdul Gafoor Mosque is in Little India off Jalan Besar in Singapore. * The information in this article was derived from Wikipedia’s article on the mosque.

The rear facade of the Masjid Abdul Gafoor is actually two stairs that ascend to the cupola at its rooftop. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The rear facade of the Masjid Abdul Gafoor is actually two stairs that ascend to the cupola at its rooftop. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The area in which Masjid Abdul Gafoor was built is also known as Kampung Kapor, which was a centre of business activity for Indian merchants.

The mosque also served Muslims who worked at the old race course at Farrer Park.

The predecessor to the Masjid Abdul Gafoor at the location was an earlier mosque named Masjid Al-Abrar which was built in 1846 for the South Indian Muslim merchants and Baweanese syces and horse trainers living in the area.

The name of the mosque at the entrance. According to Wikipedia, “In 1881, a deed of assignment dated 14 November 1881 created the Dunlop Street Mosque Endowment or wakaf. The two trustees were Ismail Mansor and Shaik Abdul Gaffoor bin Shaik Hydert. Abdul Gaffoor was the chief clerk at a legal firm. The wakaf was created for the building of a mosque for the Muslim community in Singapore. The deed of assignment also placed in trust several other properties including a Muslim burial ground and a house in Race Course Road. The burial ground was closed in 1921.” Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The name of the mosque at the entrance. According to Wikipedia, “In 1881, a deed of assignment dated 14 November 1881 created the Dunlop Street Mosque Endowment or wakaf. The two trustees were Ismail Mansor and Shaik Abdul Gaffoor bin Shaik Hydert. Abdul Gaffoor was the chief clerk at a legal firm. The wakaf was created for the building of a mosque for the Muslim community in Singapore. The deed of assignment also placed in trust several other properties including a Muslim burial ground and a house in Race Course Road. The burial ground was closed in 1921.” Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

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POTD: Masjid Abdul Gafoor in Singapore Kampung Kapor

Saturday, July 25th, 2015

The Abdul Gafoor Mosque is on Dunlop Street in the Kampung Kapor area of Singapore.

The visit to the Masjid Abdul Gafoor was part of an SG50 heritage photowalk organised by Canon Singapore, that also included visits to the Saint Joseph’s Church and Yueh Hai Ching Temple. I had the chance to try out the new EOS 5Ds and EOS M3 cameras. This photo was taken using an EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The visit to the Masjid Abdul Gafoor was part of an SG50 heritage photowalk organised by Canon Singapore, that also included visits to the Saint Joseph’s Church and Yueh Hai Ching Temple. I had the chance to try out the new EOS 5Ds and EOS M3 cameras. This photo was taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Originally built in 1907, the mosque was restored in 2003.

Merry Christmas!

Thursday, December 25th, 2014

Here’s wishing everyone who celebrates Christmas a very Happy Christmas!

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

This photo was taken with a Sony α7 II full-frame ILCE camera, and FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS Full-frame E-mount Zoom Lens (SEL70200G).

POTD: Portraits of a squirrel monkey at River Safari

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

Photo of the Day: The River Safari in Singapore has a wonderful enclosure for squirrel monkeys, where visitors are allowed to wander freely within the enclosure and view the primates up close.

It’s also ideal for photographers looking to shoot portraits of these New World Monkeys.

Due to their smaller size, they are less bold than the larger macaques and steers clear of the visitors to the enclosure. Here’s one of them peering from behind some leaves. Photo taken with an Olympus E450 with 40-150mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Due to their smaller size, they are less bold than the larger macaques and steer clear of the visitors to the enclosure. Here’s one of them peering from behind some leaves. Photo taken with an Olympus E450 with 40-150mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The squirrel monkey comes from the tropical forests of Central and South America, living in the canopy layer, and eats fruits and insects.

Here’s a squirrel monkey looking me in the eye, from the safety of the tree branches. Photo taken with an Olympus E450 with 40-150mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Here’s a squirrel monkey looking me in the eye, from the safety of the tree branches. Photo taken with an Olympus E450 with 40-150mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

These monkeys are actually slightly larger than squirrels but are smaller than the regular macaque that we’re more familiar with in this part of the world.

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