Posts Tagged ‘engineering’

REACT is Medical Winner of 2021 James Dyson Award

Saturday, November 20th, 2021

REACT, the Medical Winner for the 2021 James Dyson Award, is a device to stem bleeding to help save the lives of stabbing victims. It was invented by Joseph Bentley from Loughborough university.

* This story was first published on Haleness Me.

 The REACT system uses a rapid, inflatable Tamponade device that is inserted into the stab wound. The automated inflation of this Tamponade provides internal pressure direct to the bleeding site, controlling bleeding faster than current methods.

The REACT system uses a rapid, inflatable Tamponade device that is inserted into the stab wound. The automated inflation of this Tamponade provides internal pressure direct to the bleeding site, controlling bleeding faster than current methods.

Knife crime is an issue in many countries around the world.

In England and Wales alone, there were around 46,000 offences involving a knife or sharp instrument, which is the highest number of offences since the year ending March 2011.

The Problem

The average wait time for an ambulance in the UK is currently just over eight minutes, yet it can only take five minutes for someone to bleed to death.

The Solution

The REACT device (which stands for Rapid Emergency Actuating Tamponade) aims to reduce catastrophic blood loss from a knife wound.

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Plastic Scanner is Sustainability Winner of James Dyson Award

Friday, November 19th, 2021

The Sustainability prize for the 2021 James Dyson Award is Plastic Scanner – a low-cost, handheld device to identify plastic for recycling. It was invented by Jerry de Vos from TU Delft.

The low-cost, handheld Plastic Scanner tells you on the spot what type of plastic a product is made of.

The low-cost, handheld Plastic Scanner tells you on the spot what type of plastic a product is made of.

Plastic is a lightweight, safe and readily available material which can be used to make long-lasting, durable products.

It has a bad reputation because it is often not thought to be recyclable and so ends up in landfill, or worse on the beach or in our oceans.

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HOPES is Singapore’s 1st International Winner of James Dyson Award

Thursday, November 18th, 2021

HOPES is the first entry from Singapore to win the international top prize in the 17 years’ history of the James Dyson Award.

* This story was first published on Haleness Me.

HOPES, (which stands for Home eye Pressure E-skin Sensor) is a wearable biomedical device for pain-free, low cost, at-home IOP testing.

HOPES, (which stands for Home eye Pressure E-skin Sensor) is a wearable biomedical device for pain-free, low cost, at-home IOP testing.

HOPES is a wearable biomedical device for pain-free, low cost, at-home intra-ocular pressure (IOP) testing.

This year’s International winner of the James Dyson Award was inspired by one of the inventors’, Kelu, father’s diagnosis of glaucoma.

The Problem

After witnessing his discomfort and multiple hospital visits, she realised there is a global need for a less invasive and more accessible method for Intraocular Pressure (IOP) monitoring.

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide.

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Winners of James Dyson Award Announced with International Winner from Singapore

Wednesday, November 17th, 2021

The James Dyson Foundation has announced the winners of its James Dyson Award. This is the first time that an entry from Singapore has become the International Winner.

This is the first time in the competition’s 17 years’ history that the International Winner is from Singapore. HOPES from Singapore has bagged the international top prize.

This is the first time in the competition’s 17 years’ history that the International Winner is from Singapore. HOPES from Singapore has bagged the international top prize.

The James Dyson Award, organised by Dyson’s Charity – the James Dyson Foundation, aims to nurture and inspire a new generation of design engineers and inventors.

The brief is simple – design something that solves a problem.

While the award provides its winners with prize monies that help support the further development of their inventions, it importantly provides them a global platform to share their inventions with the world.

The James Dyson Award has now given nearly £1m in prize money to over 250 promising inventions from young engineers and scientists in 28 countries around the world.

In 2021, the Award received a record number of entries worldwide and Sir James Dyson chose three global winners for the first time, each receiving £30,000 in prize money to support the next stages of their inventions.

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