Posts Tagged ‘NHB’

Google Puts All 114 Singapore Hawkers Centres On The Map

Tuesday, July 30th, 2019

For the first time, all 114 hawker centres in Singapore will be documented on Google Maps’ Street View by early 2020.

The Google Street View Trekker weighs 18kg and contains seven high-resolution cameras to create an immersive 360-degree panoramic view. A full charge of the trekker battery lasts for 6-8hrs.

The Google Street View Trekker weighs 18kg and contains seven high-resolution cameras to create an immersive 360-degree panoramic view. A full charge of the trekker battery lasts for 6-8hrs.

The initiative is a collaboration between Google and the organisations that are co-driving the nomination to inscribe Hawker Culture in Singapore on the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The Street View Trekker with representatives from Google, NHB, NEA and FMAS, at Chinatown Market.

The Street View Trekker with representatives from Google, NHB, NEA and FMAS, at Chinatown Market.

These organisations include the National Heritage Board (NHB), National Environment Agency (NEA) and Federation Of Merchants’ Associations, Singapore (FMAS).

 

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The aim is to document Singapore’s beloved hawker centres on Google Maps to make them discoverable to anyone curious about our hawker centres or looking for their favourite hawker stalls.

More details below from the press release.

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POTD: Corridor in Masjid Abdul Gafoor in Singapore

Monday, August 10th, 2015

Amidst the searing heat of the afternoon sun, the mosque offers a cool refuge and respite for worshippers and visitors.

The corridor is still empty, although in an hours’ time, worshippers will arrive for the Friday prayers. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The corridor is still empty, although in an hours’ time, worshippers will arrive for the Friday prayers. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Masjid Abdul Gafoor was gazetted as a national monument of Singapore on 13 July 1979.

Gowns for worshippers’ perusal in the Abdul Gaffoor Mosque. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Gowns for worshippers’ perusal in the Abdul Gaffoor Mosque. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

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POTD: Prayer hall in Masjid Abdul Gafoor in Singapore

Friday, August 7th, 2015

The prayer hall is the most sacred part of the mosque and is at the core of the building, directly below the cupola and tower on the roof of the mosque.

Beautiful calligraphic inscriptions decorate the prayer hall. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Beautiful calligraphic inscriptions decorate the prayer hall. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Only worshippers are allowed into the prayer hall.

Visitors/tourists and women are not allowed inside.

Caps/songkoks for use for worshippers. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Caps/songkoks for use for worshippers. Photo taken using a Canon EOS 5Ds and EF 50mm F1.4 USM prime lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The following descriptions are from the Wikipedia article on Masjid Abdul Gaffoor.

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POTD: Rooftop tower at Masjid Abdul Gafoor in Singapore

Saturday, August 1st, 2015

Photo of the Day: The rooftop tower is directly above the cupola above the prayer hall of the mosque.

* Information from Wikipedia article on Masjid Abdul Gaffoor.

The tower has eight sides and has three levels demarcated with Doric pilasters. Photo taken using a Canon EOS M3 and 18-55mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

The tower has eight sides and has three levels demarcated with Doric pilasters. Photo taken using a Canon EOS M3 and 18-55mm kit lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

On the lowest of three levels of the tower are eight cinquefoil windows with coloured glass panes which let light through to the interior.

The middle level has pilasters and capitals below a balustrade with bottleneck balusters.

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