Posts Tagged ‘tips’

Fireworks Tip 3 of 3: Filling your frame

Thursday, August 6th, 2015

Here’s Part 3 of the three-part series on tips for shooting fireworks photos – on what kind of lens to use and getting creative with composition. Contributed by Canon Imaging Academy.

Use a wide angle lens to capture the entire fireworks scene. Photo credit: Canon Imaging Academy Associate Trainer Joseph Goh.

Use a wide angle lens to capture the entire fireworks scene. Photo credit: Canon Imaging Academy Associate Trainer Joseph Goh, Joseph Goh Photography.

Below is the final of the three-part series on tips for shooting dazzling photos of fireworks.

Editor’s note

Since the fireworks for the National Day celebrations are on such a big scale, it essentially covers a large amount of sky over the Marina Bay.

In order to capture all the different types of fireworks firing at the same time, and to avoid cropping part of a firework burst, use a wide angle camera that have a large field of view.

If you are using a zoom lens, zoom out to the widest angle.

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Fireworks Tip 2 of 3: Settings for the camera

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

Here’s Part 2 of the three-part series on tips for shooting fireworks photos – on what settings to use in your camera. Contributed by Canon Imaging Academy.

Ever wondered what camera settings to use for shooting fireworks? Check out the recommendations from the Canon Imaging Academy. Photo credit: Canon Imaging Academy.

Ever wondered what camera settings to use for shooting fireworks? Check out the recommendations from the Canon Imaging Academy. Photo credit: Canon Imaging Academy.

Here are some settings that are optimal for shooting fireworks.

Editor’s note

Many cameras, including compact ones have a dedicated Scene mode for shooting fireworks where many of the camera settings highlighted below are automatically set to appropriate levels generally suitable for fireworks.

However, because the settings are pre-canned and generally shooting most fireworks, you can’t change the settings to custom-fit the exact lighting situations or to realise your specific artistic expression.

If you want the best shots, try out the settings suggested below by the Canon Imaging Academy.

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Fireworks Tip 1 of 3: National Day Fireworks, Camera, Action!

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

The National Day Parade usually sees a spectacular display of fireworks at the end of the display. Canon Imaging Academy shares three tips to capturing great photos of fireworks.

Shooting great snapshots of fireworks is not difficult, as long as you spend a little time preparing ahead. Today’s tip is on what to prepare and how to go about it. Photo credit: Canon Imaging Academy.

Shooting great snapshots of fireworks is not difficult, as long as you spend a little time preparing ahead. Today’s tip is on what to prepare and how to go about it. Photo credit: Canon Imaging Academy.

This year being Singapore’s 50th anniversary for independence, the fireworks will be unprecedented, with daily fireworks displays throughout the Jubilee Weekend.

If you’re planning to shoot the fireworks next Sunday on 9 August, check out three quick tips that the Canon Imaging Academy has shared.

The details for these tips will be posted as a three-part series over three days, with the first tip covered today.

So read on…

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Travel Tip #3: Use Skype for overseas calls while travelling

Sunday, December 28th, 2014

In addition of making overseas calls from your home country, you can also use Skype to call family, friends and colleagues who back in your home country on their landline or mobile – when you are travelling overseas. All you need is Wi-Fi access or mobile broadband on your smartphone, and some Skype credits.

Check out Skype as an additional affordable means of voice/SMS communication when you travel overseas.

Check out Skype as an additional affordable means of voice/SMS communication when you travel overseas.

When I first arrived at Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, while waiting at the customs, I logged on to the free Wi-Fi network in the airport and used Skype to call a local sight to make enquiries and make reservations for a day trip to a wildlife rescue centre in Petchaburi.

The Suvarnabhumi Airport serving Bangkok provides a pretty decent free Wi-Fi to travellers in its terminals – good enough to make VoIP calls using Skype.

First you need to register in the login page for the AOT network in the airport and you get to use the network for free for up to 2 hours a day.

Don’t bother to memorise the complicated userid and password they issue you, the next time you use the network – which is probably when you leave Thailand – you can register as a new user again and use a new set of userid and password.

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Travel Tip #2: Bringing along a Dual-SIM phone overseas

Sunday, December 14th, 2014

A dual-SIM phone allows you to stay contactable to your regular contacts yet enables you to take advantage of more affordable local data/voice rates to avoid expensive overseas roaming charges – without having to carry two separate mobile phones.

The Motorola Moto G (2nd Generation) is one of the increasing number of smartphones that support a dual-SIM capability.

The Motorola Moto G (2nd Generation) is one of the increasing number of smartphones that support a dual-SIM capability.

Nowadays, it is increasingly easy to get a local SIM card when one travels overseas for work or leisure.

The local SIM allows you to make/receive calls at affordable local rates and more significantly, to stay connected via mobile broadband – without chalking out a huge bill.

But most mobile phones allow only one SIM card to be installed – so if you put in the local SIM card, you’ll have to remove your regular SIM card and become uncontactable to those who call you on your regular number, unless you forward those calls to your local number.

Otherwise, you’d carry a second single-SIM card phone, which is a hassle.

I brought along a Motorola Moto G (2nd Generation) dual-SIM card phone during my short break to Thailand and it was such a blessing.

There are two micro-SIM card slots so I could keep my regular SIM card in one slot and plug in the prepaid local SIM card that I bought at Suvarnabhumi Airport in the other.

The guy at the True Move counter did all the set up for me.

So after five minutes of queueing and five minutes of installation and payment, I was as connected in Thailand as I was at home back in Singapore.

I could receive roaming calls on my regular number from my friends back in Singapore and other parts of the world, while at the same stay connected on email and social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram via the mobile broadband on the local SIM card.

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Travel Tip #1: Get a pre-paid SIM card in Thailand

Saturday, December 13th, 2014

First thing I did when I exited the gates in the Arrival Hall in Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok was to get myself a pre-paid SIM card that gave me a local number for voice calls and seven days of mobile data broadband at 299 THB.

The truemove shop is one of the first things you come across when you exit the gates at the Arrival Hall at Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, Thailand.

The truemove shop is one of the first things you come across when you exit the gates at the Arrival Hall at Suvarnabhumi Airport in Bangkok, Thailand.

Immediately after exiting the gates in the Arrival Hall, you’ll come upon this telco shop that sells pre-paid SIM cards, as well as other mobile plans.

The 7-day prepaid SIM card offered by True Move is one of a few pre-paid mobile plans available in Thailand. This package bundles 7 days of unlimited data, free call credits of 100 THB and incoming call, your own local number, attractive international call rates - all for 299 THB or approximately S$12.

The 7-day prepaid SIM card offered by True Move is one of a few pre-paid mobile plans available in Thailand. This package bundles 7 days of unlimited data, free call credits of 100 THB and incoming call, your own local number, attractive international call rates – all for 299 THB or approximately S$12.

Here’s where you can grab an affordable and convenient pre-paid SIM card that gives you mobile broad band as well as voice calls, and a local number.

I’m here for seven days, so I was delighted to grab the 7-day SIM card that costs 299 THB, or S$12.

You get seven days of free broadband mobile data as well as 100 THB of free call credits, which gives you 100min of local talk time at 1 THB/minute.

The seven days are calendar days and includes the day you bought the card, ending at 2359hrs on the seventh day.

What I found useful was not only the free call credits but having a local number that you can give out for others to contact you via local calls.

My wife can now call me at local rates, through her autoroam.

Otherwise, she would have to make an overseas call just to get me on my Singapore mobile number – you know sometimes we get separated in crowded places, or we deliberately split up to visit different shops etc.

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Tips: Google’s seven top tips for Safer Internet Day

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Since today is “Safer Internet Day”, here are seven “Don’t” tips from Google that can help you stay safe on the Internet.

Are you ready for a Safer Internet?

Are you ready for a Safer Internet?

Here are seven tips from Google of things you need to start doing right away to stay safe online.

  1. Don’t use the same password for everything: It’s like handing your house keys (and every other key) to everyone you meet.
  2. Don’t have an “easy” password: If your password contains the word ‘password’ or numbers in sequence, think again. One way to create (and remember) a complex password is to think of a phrase or sentence (perhaps the lyrics to a song you like?) and use the first letter of each word to create the password. Or think of places you’ve lived, and spell them backwards. Something, anything!

  3. Don’t rely solely on a password: It’s so yesterday to have only a password for your most important accounts. Turn on two-factor authentication. Like your bank’s OTP, an SMS code or mobile app that gives you a second code when you’re accessing your account from an unfamiliar computer will give you extra peace of mind.
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Photography tips and experiences from pro Scott A. Woodward

Saturday, July 20th, 2013

Scott A. Woodward is a SanDisk Extreme Team member, a Nikon Professional Photographer and a Getty Images Global Assignments photographer. He shares his experiences and photography tips in a Q&A below.

Scott A. Woodward at one of four sessions of Nikon's

Scott A. Woodward at one of four sessions of Nikon’s “I am a Fashionista” photography workshop in Singapore.

Woodward shared three tips for beginners who are starting out: Be inspired, Play with light, Experiment.

1. Be inspired

Do a little research about the who or what you will be shooting ahead of time. The more you know about what or who you will be shooting, the better prepared you can be.

Try to have some ideas for the types of photographs you want to create beforehand. There is no shame in looking at other photographers’ interpretations of a location or scene.

Use others’ work – there is an endless stream of imagery from photographers across the globe on Instagram and Flickr and Twitter – to be inspired and help get your creative juices flowing so you can create your own unique photography.

2. Play with light

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Seven cyber security myth busters from Symantec and Norton

Friday, May 17th, 2013

Based on data from the recent annual 2013 Internet Security Threat Report, Volume 18, Symantec debunks seven of the most commonly held myths around cybersecurity.

Infographic from Symantec and Norton to debunk the top 7 cybersecurity myths. Click to view enlarged version.

Infographic from Symantec and Norton to debunk the top 7 cybersecurity myths. Click to view enlarged version.

Contrary to the popular belief that staying away from risky sites will is enough to protect your computer – did you know that 61% of malicious sites are actually legitimate websites that have been compromised and infected with malicious codes?

At the same time, do be extra careful when accessing your social networks – be on the lookout for scams involving fake gift cards and surveys as these comprise 56% of attacks on social media.

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Setting up a home shared network hard drive

Sunday, September 25th, 2011

Over time, as we get new computers and leave the old still-functional computer as a second or third machine, and we still utilise the different machines, the files we create and work on can get distributed amidst the hard disk drives of the various computers.

A shared network hard drive can bring order back to an increasingly chaotic situation.

A network attached external hard drive can share files and media amongst computers and media players in the home

A network attached external hard drive can share files and media (illustration modified from www.buffalotech.com)

The above scenario was what happened to some of my friends and me. Computers and laptops today can last for a long time (if you look after them well) and most often then not, they’re still perfectly functionable when we get a new machine so it seems quite a waste to get rid of the old machine, especially since it can serve as a back up.

And if a member of the family is on the new laptop, others can use the spare computer. So over time, working files, photos, music and video can get distributed over a few computers. At first, it’s easy to remember and keep track of which file is in which computer and do the occasional transfer using an USB thumbdrive.

But over time, as the number of files grow, things can get out of hand – the convenience of being able to work on a few computers turns into a bane.

Now that cloud computing is catching on and we can save files and media on the Internet, this mess can be ameliorated. But those personal and confidential files and humongous video files are still best kept in local storage.

The NAS solution

Schematic of an NAS solution

Schematic of an NAS solution

So over the weekend, I helped my friend rig a similar solution that I use at home – set up a simple external hard drive that can be shared and accessed by a few different computers at home over a local Wi-Fi network.

Those files that are stored on the network attached storage (NAS) drive can then remain accessible no matter which computer you’re working on. It can be used to back up the computers connected.

Some NAS drives allow you to stream media to TVs, media players and game consoles connected to the home network.

In fact, some even enable access to be opened out to the Internet, so that when you’re outstation – in the office, on the road, or overseas – you can still securely access the files stored in the hard drive. This can be done via a browser on a laptop connected to the Internet, or via an app on a smartphone or tablet.

It’s like setting up your personal cloud storage. There are many consumer NAS drives in the market from makers such as Seagate, Western Digital and Buffalo.

They’re all designed to be easily set up by the layman who does not have a PhD in computer science. These NAS drives are connected directly to the router rather than a specific computer acting as a file server.

Any computer connected to the network via the router can access the NAS drive at any time.

Because these NAS drives are more intelligent than the regular dumb external hard drive, they do cost a slight premium over the latter. The NAS drives can manage network access by computers on the network and implement security, access and rights control as well.

Seagate GoFlex Home comes in capacities of 1TB, 2TB and 3TB

Seagate GoFlex Home comes in capacities of 1TB, 2TB and 3TB

Since I’m familiar with the Seagate GoFlex Home, that was what I recommended my friend, who brought home a 3 TB version from the recent COMEX 2011 for S$299.

Tomorrow we’ll see how he managed to tame his growing diaspora of media and files.