Posts Tagged ‘Tech Focus’

Trends: Phishing Against SMBs Increase in Singapore & Region

Wednesday, September 16th, 2020

In the first half of 2020, phishing attempts targeting SMBs in Singapore increased by 61%, mirroring similar increases across South East Asian countries.

Number of phishing attempts against SMBs blocked by Kaspersky Anti-Phishing System, year-on-year.

Number of phishing attempts against SMBs blocked by Kaspersky Anti-Phishing System, year-on-year.

With the COVID-19 pandemic accelerating Singapore’s digitalisation efforts, SMBs have become the focal point of discussion for many, as funding worries and the shift to telecommuting have left them in no man’s land.

“Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Singapore continues to retain attraction as the region’s premier business hub, and speaks well of the local businesses’ ability to remain resilient despite headwinds from the global slowdown. However, almost half (41%) of businesses continue to express that the high costs of investment – lack of financing and funding – are major barriers holding them back from digitalisation. The implications of this statistic are significant, as it means cybersecurity may not be a key priority for businesses during this period of cost-cutting,” says Stephan Neumeier, Managing Director for Asia Pacific at Kaspersky.

While the Government has launched generous initiatives such as the new training and adult education industry digitalisation plan to augment SMBs’ competitiveness, malicious actors continue to find new ways to test businesses’ digital readiness.

According to Kaspersky’s latest statistics, the global cybersecurity company foiled 89,351 phishing attacks against SMBs in H1 2020, compared to 55,653 in the same period last year.

Although Singapore continues to fare better than their SMB counterparts in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam to witness the lowest volume of phishing attacks in Southeast Asia, the 61% increase suggests that more can be done by Singapore’s SMBs to improve their cybersecurity.

More details below from the presentation and press release.

(more…)

Tech Focus: NUS Showcases InfinityGlove Smart Gaming Glove Prototype

Friday, August 21st, 2020

The InfinityGlove contains ultra-sensitive microfibre sensors that can translate hand gestures into in-game commands, allowing users to play first-person shooters such as Battlefield V without the need for a traditional controller or a keyboard.

The InfinityGlove was developed by a team of NUS researchers led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck (left). With him are two members of the research team, Dr Yeo Joo Chuan (centre) and Dr Yu Longteng (right). Photo: National University of Singapore.

The InfinityGlove was developed by a team of NUS researchers led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck (left). With him are two members of the research team, Dr Yeo Joo Chuan (centre) and Dr Yu Longteng (right). Photo: National University of Singapore.

Simply flex your index finger to fire your weapon and rotate your wrist clockwise to move forward. Immersive controls have always been a pipedream in the world of gaming but is steadily becoming reality.

Editor’s Comments

This is an interesting and innovative project.

Currently each finger of the glove contains one microfibre sensor that can differentiate two states – straightened or curled – due to the difference in conductivity of the liquid metal within the fibre in the two states.

So the overall status of the glove should be readable as a five-digit binary.

Would be good to add one more to the wrist to include bending of the wrist.

And in the longer term, I can think of two ways of improving the resolution of the sensing.

One would be to implement multiple sensors per strand of microfibre.

Another would be to weave multiple microfibre strands to provide a matrix detection pattern for a snapshot of the state of each sensor.

That could probably come in useful as a grid sensor to monitor the distribution of stresses/deformation on a surface etc.

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS), led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck, has developed a smart glove – called ‘InfinityGlove’ – that allows users to mimic a variety of in-game controls using simple hand gestures.

While the concept of controlling a game using your hands is not new, the main problems have always been weight and flexibility.

The current generation of smart glove type controllers available on the market are usually bulky and rigid as they rely on conventional sensors which put the hard in hardware.

The InfinityGlove overcomes existing problems with weight and flexibility by weaving ultra-thin, highly sensitive microfibre sensors into the material of the glove.

These sensors are not only lightweight and accurate, but also fulfil the role of wires thus reducing the need for additional wiring.

Currently the prototype weighs about 40 grams, and is flexible and comfortable.

More details below from the press release.

(more…)

Visa Study: 2 In 3 Singaporeans Interested In Using Neobanks

Wednesday, March 25th, 2020

Close to 65% of Singaporeans are open to the idea of adopting a digital-only bank, according to the Visa Consumer Payment Attitudes Study.

* All infographics in this story courtesy of Visa.

It comes as no surprise that if consumers were to adopt a digital bank - interest is highest for an existing issuer given the trust already associated with the issuer. Click on infographic to enlarge.

It comes as no surprise that if consumers were to adopt a digital bank – interest is highest for an existing issuer given the trust already associated with the issuer. Click on infographic to enlarge.

The Visa Consumer Payment Attitudes Study was conducted in October 2019 by ENGINE Insights with 511 Singaporeans aged 18-65 years of age.

3 in 4 Singaporeans are aware of the concept of Digital Banking - whilst nearly 2 in 3 would be curious of adopting a digital only bank. Click on infographic to enlarge.

3 in 4 Singaporeans are aware of the concept of Digital Banking – whilst nearly 2 in 3 would be curious of adopting a digital only bank. Click on infographic to enlarge.

This is part of a regional research project conducted in Southeast Asia on 5,000 consumers across seven markets in Southeast Asia.

(more…)

Tech Focus: Watching Parasite & Its Search Trends On Google

Saturday, February 22nd, 2020

I just watched the Oscar-winning Parasite during the week with the family. It was entertaining as a comedy and thought-provoking as a satire. Great movie. Here’s some data on how people searched about the movie during Oscar season.

A refreshing treatment of the age-old dichotomy between the haves and the have-nots.

A refreshing treatment of the age-old dichotomy between the haves and the have-nots.

My family and I watched the movie over dinner time and thoroughly enjoyed the dark but refreshingly directed satire, including my teenage son, although he did express a desire to take a hiatus from the genre in the coming months.

So here’s what Google shared about the interest that global viewers showed in the first non-English language film to win the Oscar for Best Picture – instead of just the traditional Academy Award for Best International Feature Film.

As a Best Picture nominee in the week prior to the awards, Parasite was the third-most-searched nominee behind “1917” and “Jojo Rabbit”.

Incidentally, we’ve also watched Jojo Rabbit and found it an excellent movie. We’ll probably watch 1917 after my son’s hiatus.

What does winning the Oscars do for our career and business?

On Oscars day, Parasite searches jumped almost nine-fold to become top-searched.

(more…)

Trends: NetApp Predictions For 2020

Friday, January 3rd, 2020

Atish Gude, NetApp’s Chief Strategy Officer shares three predictions for 2020, putting the spotlight on 5G, Blockchain and infrastructure virtualisation solutions.

* This article is contributed by Atish Gude, based on his professional experience and personal opinions.

What does 2020 hold in store?

What does 2020 hold in store?

2019 was a year of rapid innovation – and disruption – for both the IT industry and the broader business community.

With the widespread adoption of hybrid multicloud as the de-facto architecture for enterprise customers, organisations everywhere are under tremendous pressure to modernise their infrastructure and deliver tangible business value around data-intensive applications and workloads.

Multiclouds & Virtualisation

Multiclouds & Virtualisation

As a result, organisations are shifting from on-premises to leverage public cloud services, building private clouds, and moving from disk to flash in data centers – sometimes concurrently.

These transformations open the door to enormous potential, but also introduce the unintended consequence of rising IT complexity.

We predict that a demand for simplicity and customisability will be the number-one factor driving IT purchasing decisions in 2020.

Data-driven transformations

Data-driven transformations

Vendors will need to provide customers modern, flexible technologies with the choice of how to use and consumes these technologies to meet evolving business models.

As IT departments look to de-emphasise maintenance and hardware, reduce overhead, and adopt pay-as-you-go models, simplicity and choice will be key.

Achieving this simplicity will serve as the foundation for companies as they navigate the exciting technological trends we’ve identified below.

(more…)

Tech Focus: What Are Zoonoses And How Can Technology Help (Part 2 of 2)

Saturday, September 28th, 2019

How can technology help in the fight against zoonisis? Aspiring vet, Erin Tan, did some research on the topic and shares what she thinks in this second article in a two-part series.

* This article first appeared in HalenessMe.

The web-based app Supramap uses genomic data to track the global movement of avian influenza virus.

The web-based app Supramap uses genomic data to track the global movement of avian influenza virus.

Emerging technology can help in mainly two ways.

Firstly, through harnessing the power of Big Data, information from previous outbreaks, and studies conducted independently around the world, can be collated to help predict where a deadly zoonotic virus will strike next.

The vast availability of health data today means that data must be intelligently handled, using the right tools to derive helpful trends.

For instance, Google Flu Trends collated data from users’ searches to estimate influenza activity, and was found to show strong correlation with official data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the 2009 flu pandemic.

The web-based app Supramap uses genomic data to track the global movement of avian influenza virus.

Google Flu Trends collated data from users’ searches to estimate influenza activity.

Google Flu Trends collated data from users’ searches to estimate influenza activity.

(more…)

Tech Focus: What Are Zoonoses And How Can Technology Help (Part 1 of 2)

Saturday, September 21st, 2019

The word ‘zoonosis’ is not one that is popular in the common lexicon, and yet it is something that can affect our lives profoundly. Aspiring vet med student, Erin Tan, did some research on the topic and shares what she thinks in this two-part story.

* This article first appeared in HalenessMe.

Zoonoses. Source: GAO.

Zoonoses. Source: GAO.

A zoonosis is a disease which can be transferred from animals to humans, and there are many examples of zoonoses which many are familiar with.

One has only to recall the SARS outbreak of 2003 to recognise the destructive potential of zoonoses.

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), a disease which originated from viruses in bats that jumped to palm civets and then to humans, severely impacted countries like Hong Kong, China, Singapore, and even Canada.

774 lives were claimed globally by this never-before-seen disease.

Stories of doctors, nurses and other health workers who had perished saving the lives of SARS patients filled the papers.

International travel to affected areas dropped sharply by 50-70%, resulting in the closure of many tourism-related businesses.

The civet cat is closely associated with the outbreak of SARS in Asia.

The civet cat is closely associated with the outbreak of SARS in Asia.

Clearly, while the containment of SARS – especially in Singapore – is generally hailed as a success story, the outbreak did result in significant social and economic drawbacks.

(more…)

Tech Focus: Veterinary Medicine Meets TeleMedicine

Saturday, February 16th, 2019

Pet ownership is on the rise, and so is telemedicine for humans. Is telemedicine also useful for diagnosis and treatment of animals? Aspiring vet med student, Erin Tan, did some research on the topic and shares what she thinks.

Consult a vet from home via the Internet. Photo by Velizar Ivanov on Unsplash.

Consult a vet from home via the Internet. Photo by Velizar Ivanov on Unsplash.

Pet ownership is on the rise.

With canine pets licensed in Singapore increasing by 32% in the past decade – according to the Agri-Veterinary Authority of Singapore – and the booming pet industry in places like China and India, it is evident that pet owners form a large, and valuable, market.

With teleconsultation, the vet can “see to” animals needing medical consultations even when he/she is not in the clinic.

With teleconsultation, the vet can “see to” animals needing medical consultations even when he/she is not in the clinic.

The pet-care market in Asia is valued at around US$1 billion a year, and is expected to grow to US$1.5 billion by 2020.

Another trend in recent years is the rise of telemedicine in the human health industry.

There has been a proliferation of apps like MaNaDr, Doctor Anywhere and MyDoc, which aim to connect patients with doctors over a digital platform and make the provision of healthcare much more convenient.

There is much potential in marrying the two thriving industries together, by making telemedicine available for veterinarians to deliver medical advice and consultations to pet-owners, through virtual means.

Manifestations of veterinary telemedicine would include platforms for pet-owners to ask vets for advice by sending photos and messages to vets on duty, or tele-consults via video calls.

(more…)

Tech focus: CyArk & Seagate preserves world heritage sites

Saturday, July 1st, 2017

CyArk & Seagate are collaborating to preserve world heritage sites in the digital realm for the benefit of posterity.

I came across a meaningful project this week – an international non-profit organisation named CyArk is actively capturing digital images and physical dimensions of historical sites and structures to create photorealistic 3D models for archival.

Editor’s note:

I’m really happy that such meaningful work is being carried out by organisations such as CyArk, founded by Iraqi civil engineer Ben Kacyra.

It is a great example of how technology is being harnessed in a positive way for the benefit of humanity.

It’s also fantastic that CyArk enjoys recognition and support from the public and large corporations such as Seagate, Google and Autodesk.

Bravo!

This is so that future generations can reference these resources even if the actual archeological sites are damaged – through war, natural disasters, or age – or completely destroyed.

They have been at it since 2003 and are supported by corporations such as Seagate which began their partnership with CyArk in 2015 by providing its data storage solutions both in the field and in the office.

Since 2003, CyArk has amassed high-tech digital records of over 200 heritage sites in 40 countries, including Angkor Wat in Cambodia, Bagan in Myanmar and the Sydney Opera House in Australia.

In recent years, CyArk has upped the ante by capturing additional photos that can be used to render interactive virtual reality (VR) content for users to enjoy an immersive experience when “visiting” these historical sites in the virtual realm.

(more…)