Archive for the ‘Medical’ Category

Five Sleep Tips for World Sleep Day Today

Friday, March 19th, 2021

Today is World Sleep Day, so here are five tips on how to get a better night’s sleep from sleep expert Fitbit.

Sleep like a baby with 5 sleep tips from Fitbit. Photo by Tara Raye on Unsplash.

Sleep like a baby with 5 sleep tips from Fitbit. Photo by Tara Raye on Unsplash.

Getting our eight hours of quality sleep every night is important as adequate sleep and regular sleep patterns help rejuvenate our mood regulation, cognitive function, and overall health.

According to Fitbit’s data in 2020, Singaporeans were sleeping more last year.

However, Singaporeans still had one of the lowest sleep durations in the region, indicating there is still room for us to improve our quality of sleep.

So here are five tips for ways you can sleep longer and get a better quality shut eye.

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Study: Singaporeans Lose Sleep Over COVID-19 Pandemic

Thursday, March 18th, 2021

The Philips 2021 global sleep survey finds that Singaporeans now average 6.8 hrs of sleep per night, down from 7 hours in the 2020 survey.

A year since the start of COVID-19, Singaporeans' sleep issues loom large.

A year since the start of COVID-19, Singaporeans’ sleep issues loom large.

The Philips 2021 global sleep survey, in its sixth annual installment, is being released to mark World Sleep Day tomorrow.

The study also found that over half (57%) of Singaporeans’ ability to sleep well has been directly impacted by the pandemic, with more than a third experiencing negative impact on their stress, ability to sleep well, mental/emotional health, sleep and work routines.

With telehealth on the rise, Singaporeans are open to online means to address sleep-related
concerns, yet fear hinders many from getting tested for obstructive sleep apnea.

More details below from the study.

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New Arrival: Livinguard Masks Against COVID-19 SARS-COV-2 Virus

Saturday, November 7th, 2020

Livinguard has brought its reusable face masks in Singapore. Three versions for different levels of protection (and breathability) are available online at Shopee, Lazada and ORO. Prices below.

 

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Here are the Street (2 layers) and Pro (3 layers) of the Livinguard masks.

I tried out the Street and Pro versions and liked them.

It feels light, fitting and doesn’t clog up the nostrils when you breathe.

There are three versions for different levels of protection and breathability, in 4 colours and 3 sizes.

Each mask can be rinsed once a week for up to 30 times – so that works out to 210 days of usage.

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Review: Hydragun Percussive Therapy Massage Gun

Sunday, October 4th, 2020

The Hydragun is a percussive massage therapy device designed for sports recovery – to provide speedy and effective muscle pain relief for high-performance athletes and people working from home.

 

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The Hydragun comes in a case for carrying it around to the gym or office.

Massage guns have become very popular lately with athletes engaging in sports and fitness activities; as well as people working from home, using home furniture not suited for extended hours of work – resulting in poor postures, back & shoulder aches and carpal tunnel syndrome in the hands.

So a good massage gun has become a must-have for working adults.

The Hydragun is a Singapore-designed, China-manufactured massage gun targeting sports enthusiasts from all walks of life.

Starting from the packaging and the design and build, you can tell the company is serious about making a tool that provides effective healing and recovery for sports injuries or work sores and aches – unlike many no-brand OEM products on the bandwagon that was hastily thrown into a box with minimal documentation and sold for a song.

 

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The S$399 Hydragun alongside a S$50 OEM massage gun from a friend who bought it online. The latter was heavy and unbalanced, had no return policy or warranty and stopped working after two months even though it was hardly used. The Hydragun comes with a 30-day “No Questions Asked” Return Policy and an 18 month-warranty.

In the box, the Hydragun comprises the main vibrating therapy massager (the big gun), six head attachments (four regular, two with stainless steel heads), one charger, one manual, and a robust zippered case to easily carry it all to the gym.

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Tech Focus: NUS Showcases InfinityGlove Smart Gaming Glove Prototype

Friday, August 21st, 2020

The InfinityGlove contains ultra-sensitive microfibre sensors that can translate hand gestures into in-game commands, allowing users to play first-person shooters such as Battlefield V without the need for a traditional controller or a keyboard.

The InfinityGlove was developed by a team of NUS researchers led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck (left). With him are two members of the research team, Dr Yeo Joo Chuan (centre) and Dr Yu Longteng (right). Photo: National University of Singapore.

The InfinityGlove was developed by a team of NUS researchers led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck (left). With him are two members of the research team, Dr Yeo Joo Chuan (centre) and Dr Yu Longteng (right). Photo: National University of Singapore.

Simply flex your index finger to fire your weapon and rotate your wrist clockwise to move forward. Immersive controls have always been a pipedream in the world of gaming but is steadily becoming reality.

Editor’s Comments

This is an interesting and innovative project.

Currently each finger of the glove contains one microfibre sensor that can differentiate two states – straightened or curled – due to the difference in conductivity of the liquid metal within the fibre in the two states.

So the overall status of the glove should be readable as a five-digit binary.

Would be good to add one more to the wrist to include bending of the wrist.

And in the longer term, I can think of two ways of improving the resolution of the sensing.

One would be to implement multiple sensors per strand of microfibre.

Another would be to weave multiple microfibre strands to provide a matrix detection pattern for a snapshot of the state of each sensor.

That could probably come in useful as a grid sensor to monitor the distribution of stresses/deformation on a surface etc.

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS), led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck, has developed a smart glove – called ‘InfinityGlove’ – that allows users to mimic a variety of in-game controls using simple hand gestures.

While the concept of controlling a game using your hands is not new, the main problems have always been weight and flexibility.

The current generation of smart glove type controllers available on the market are usually bulky and rigid as they rely on conventional sensors which put the hard in hardware.

The InfinityGlove overcomes existing problems with weight and flexibility by weaving ultra-thin, highly sensitive microfibre sensors into the material of the glove.

These sensors are not only lightweight and accurate, but also fulfil the role of wires thus reducing the need for additional wiring.

Currently the prototype weighs about 40 grams, and is flexible and comfortable.

More details below from the press release.

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COVID-19: Which Sanitizer to Use for Post-Circuit Breaker Protection?

Saturday, June 20th, 2020

Phase 2 of post-Circuit Breaker measures has begun in Singapore. As we venture out of #WorkFromHome & #HomeBasedLearning to meet more people and visit more places, here’s a good hand sanitiser that is not only effective but allows you to enjoy prolonged protection without any skin irritation.

* This story was first published in Haleness Me.

There are so many sanitisers out there in the market, what are the characteristics to look out for when choosing a good sanitiser

There are so many sanitisers out there in the market, what are the characteristics to look out for when choosing a good sanitiser?

There are many sanitisers available out there – how should we select one that will fulfill the task of protecting us from COVID-19, over an extended period of time?

When it comes to skin sanitisers, who better to get advice from than a skin specialist?

This was what I learned from Dr Coni Liu, a consultant dermatologist from DS Skin Clinic in Singapore.

Firstly, the sanitiser must be effective, not only against the SARS-COV-2 but against most pathogens that we encounter on a daily basis.

After all, that’s why we are applying a hand sanitiser right?

Generally, there are two types of hand sanitisers – alcohol-based and non-alcohol based.

The alcohol-based sanitisers are more effective and fast-acting, while the non-alcohol based sanitisers are generally less effective and slow-acting – more suitable for object surfaces rather than the skin.

Secondly, it must be kind to the skin.

Many alcohol-based sanitisers are effective but tend to be dehydrating and harsh to the skin.

Thirdly, you need one that lasts over a longer period of time, to increase the effectiveness against germs, and to reduce the need for frequent application.

This will better protect one’s skin against the damaging effects of the sanitiser and neutralise the adverse effects of the alcohol content which is necessary for killing the germs.

Dr Coni Liu, Consultant Dermatologist at DS Skin & Wellness Clinic.

Dr Coni Liu, Consultant Dermatologist at DS Skin & Wellness Clinic.

Therefore, the perfect sanitizer would be highly-effective, long-lasting, and would have a formulation which protects and moisturises the skin.

Looking at the sanitisers available in the market, they’re either alcohol-based and effective in killing germs but are unkind to our skins – or they’re non-alcohol-based but are less effective and slow acting.

Apparently that was the dilemma that Dr Liu faced when her patients asked her to recommend a good hand sanitizer that satisfied these requirements.

And guess what, she and her fellow dermatologists highlighted this problem to their boss – Dr Henry Loh – and he commissioned DS Skin Clinic’s in-house scientist Dr Richard Seow to develop a hand sanitiser that met all these needs.

To cut a long story short, after an extensive but rapid local research and development effort, DS Skin Clinic has come up with a hand sanitiser that immediately kills 99.99% of most household germs, including the SARS-COV-2 virus; lasts for 24 hours; and which is gentle to the skin through the inclusion of an emollient oil.

The DS Skin Clinic All-Day Hand Sanitizer was just launched two days ago – just in time for Phase 2 of the post-CB measures.

The rest, as they say, is history.

Read the details about the hand sanitiser below from the press release.

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Canon Singapore Launches Safe Entry Solution for Retail & Offices

Thursday, June 18th, 2020

The system consists of a device with a camera, temperature screening and a scanner that reads the identification card of a visitor for an integrated safe entry experience. As the solution is also a self-service system, workplaces can reduce manpower managing entry stations.

Canon's new all-in-one entry-control system: FACTS.

Canon’s new all-in-one entry-control system: FACTS.

Canon Singapore announced today the launch of a digital check-in solution which enables businesses to facilitate contactless, fast and easy temperature screening and entry/exit recording for staff and customers.

The solution, which is known as Facial Access Control Temperature System (FACTS), uses an 8-inch tablet which combines the functions of a camera, infrared thermography, near-field communication (NFC) device, barcode scanner and data storage.

The tablet is a third-party device distributed by Canon Singapore.

To check in, visitors should stand within 0.5 to 0.7metre from the device to have their temperature screened via the infrared thermography.

If the visitor’s temperature is within a predetermined range, a green text box will be shown to indicate that the visitor has passed the temperature screening.

This will be accompanied by an automated voice message which says, “temperature normal”.

The device will then request for the visitor’s identity, which can be quickly obtained by scanning the visitor’s identification cards such as NRIC (the latest digital version is also accepted) and driver’s license at the barcode scanner.

The device also can be set to automatically take a photo of the visitor, if required.

It takes just a few seconds to complete the entire process.

FACTS can also be used to facilitate the use of Singapore’s national digital check-in system, SafeEntry, to help retail stores, offices and other businesses comply with safe management measures at the workplace.

More details below from the press release.

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Tech Focus: Ingestible Electronic Pills For Stomach Diagnosis

Wednesday, April 29th, 2020

Just as IoT is taking the tech world by storm, ingestible pills enable doctors and researchers to emplace micro sensors in our bodies to monitor sustained measurements for diagnosis or research.

In this guest blog, Nick Van Helleputte and Chris Van Hoof discuss how ingestible or electronic pills can revolutionise the way stomach ailments are diagnosed.

Mock-up of an ingestible pill with prototype transceiver. Image: Imec.

Mock-up of an ingestible pill with prototype transceiver. Image: Imec.

Speak about an electronic pill or a small ingestible machine that can be swallowed by patients to monitor their bodies – and what comes to mind is often swarms of nanobots.

The reality is a little different.

Today, breakthroughs in electronics are making it possible to imagine such ingestibles, which are small enough to be swallowed so they can stay inside a body to monitor, say, a person’s stomach condition over a period of time.

Editor’s Comments

These nifty gadgets open up a whole new frontier in medical diagnosis and research.

Think the Internet of Things (IoT) but applied to the interior of our bodies.

By emplacing sensors within our bodies, doctors and researchers don’t just get a one-off snapshot of the organ of interest.

The sensors can provide sustained monitoring of measurements over a period of time, enabling the identification of trends in the data, or triggering of alerts to flag out anomalies breaching threshold levels.

This means a doctor would be able to more accurately see the changes in a person’s digestive tract, for example, instead of having only a quick look by using a scope or collecting stool samples.

So, instead of a number of nanobots swimming inside a person, ingestibles are miniaturised versions of electronic devices that require low power and have reliable wireless communication to relay the signals that they are reading.

In February 2020, Belgium-based research outfit imec presented the world’s first fully integrated millimetre-scale wireless transceiver for ingestibles or electronic analytical devices that can be swallowed.

This breakthrough, presented at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) 2020 conference at San Francisco in February, means that in the future, ingestible devices could be easier to be manufactured and be more effective in staying in a stomach to monitor important signs of diseases, such as diabetes, Crohn’s Disease or coeliac.

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MedTech: Remote Monitoring Solution By KaHa & EasyCare iDOC

Thursday, April 23rd, 2020

Singapore IoT and smart wearables firm KaHa teams up with healthcare partner EasyCare International (iDOC) to launch Remote Monitoring Solution in Singapore.

By leveraging technology, the partnership between KaHa and EasyCare iDOC aims to bring greater convenience and efficacy to healthcare management.

By leveraging technology, the partnership between KaHa and EasyCare iDOC aims to bring greater convenience and efficacy to healthcare management.

As part of the company’s commitment to health and wellness, Singapore Internet of Things (IoT) solutions company KaHa launched today its partnership with medical solutions provider EasyCare and its brand iDOC.

iDOC Clinic is a medical group founded by the EasyCare team, and EasyCare works with iDOC Clinic in the implementation of its healthcare technologies in the primary care setting.

As part of its services, EasyCare conducts annual or biannual chronic disease screening for corporate clients.

In between screenings, the iDOCWATCH together with mobile app iDOC Easy Track, will be made available to individuals to enable continuous monitoring of their health by collecting and analysing essential health data from the user to be sent to the iDOC Remote Monitoring Dashboard, which aims to improve health and fitness amongst users.

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New Arrival: Huawei Watch GT 2e In Singapore For Mother’s Day

Tuesday, April 21st, 2020

Huawei Singapore is launching the Huawei GT 2e (S$218) in Singapore in conjunction with the approaching Mother’s Day. Pre-orders from 21-24 April with promotions. The watch arrives in Singapore on 25 April. Prices below.

Designed for an active lifestyle, Huawei Watch 2e sports new colours: Graphite Black, Lava Red, Mint Green and Icy White.

Designed for an active lifestyle, Huawei Watch 2e sports new colours: Graphite Black, Lava Red, Mint Green and Icy White.

The Huawei Watch GT 2e, unveiled globally last month, is the latest addition to the Huawei Watch GT 2 series.

The Huawei Watch GT 2e is available for pre-order from today with selected consumer electronic retailers, Huawei online official stores on Lazada and Shopee at a retail price of S$218.

From 21 – 24 April, customers with a pre-order will enjoy a free gift bundle worth S$106, comprising a Huawei Body Fat Scale and an orange watch strap.

The Huawei Watch GT 2e will be available at Huawei official online stores on Lazada and Shopee as well as authorised resellers from 25 April.

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